Quebecers ask Superior Court to invalidate Mary Simon's nomination

Des Qué bécois are asking the Superior Court to invalidate the nomination of Mary Simon

The group relies on a legal precedent in New Brunswick, where Acadians recently challenged, on similar grounds, the appointment of a unilingual English-speaking lieutenant-governor.

Des Quebecers are turning to the courts to overturn the nomination of Mary Simon as Governor General because she is not fluent in French.

Led by the professor of x27;history Frédéric Bastien, the group filed, on Wednesday, in the Superior Court of Quebec, a motion for a judgment to declare null, invalid and inapplicable the appointment of Ms. Simon.

According to the group, this appointment violates the provisions of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which states that French and English are the official languages ​​of Canada. The class of plaintiffs includes the Association for the Defense of Individual and Collective Rights of Quebec and the organization Justice pour le Quebec.

Mr. Bastien, who was a candidate for the leadership of the Parti Québécois in 2020, says that choosing a governor general who does not speak one of the country's two official languages ​​is an insult to French speakers and a signal that bilingualism does not matter in Canada.

Canada's Governor General, Mary Simon, speaks English and Inuktitut. She promised to learn French. However, Mr. Bastien says the government should have chosen one of the many qualified Indigenous candidates who speak both official languages.

In its application to the Superior Court, his group relies on a legal precedent in New Brunswick, where Acadians recently challenged, on similar grounds, the appointment of a unilingual English-speaking lieutenant-governor.

The Chief Justice of the Court of Queen's Bench of New Brunswick ruled last April that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau violated the language protection provisions guaranteed by the Canadian Constitution when he appointed Brenda Murphy.< /p>

Judge Tracey K. DeWare has ruled that the Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick must be bilingual and able to perform all the duties required of his role in English and in French. She added, however, that overturning the appointment would lead to a constitutional crisis.

In May, Ottawa announced that it would appeal this decision, arguing that the appointment power of the Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick does not contain any bilingualism requirement and that neither the Constitution nor the Charter can do so. ;subject to such a requirement.

The appointment of Ms. Simon is unconstitutional because it violates the provisions on bilingualism, explained in an interview Thursday Mr. Bastien, currently professor of history at Dawson College, an Anglophone CEGEP in Montreal.

This appointment is an insult to Francophones across the country and, of course, first and foremost to the Quebec national minority, argued Mr. Bastien, author in 2013 of the essay The Battle of London – Behind the scenes, secrets and scenes of constitutional repatriation.

The Acadians were right to stand up […]. We, we said to ourselves: "Here, we are no more silly than the Acadians." […] This is our gift to Mr. Trudeau for Canada Day.

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