Ukraine investigates 28,000 possible war crimes committed by Russian forces | War in Ukraine

Ukraine investigates possible 28,000 war crimes committed by Russian forces | War in Ukraine

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Ukraine is currently conducting more than 28,000 investigations into possible war crimes committed by the Russian military, according to the Ukrainian ambassador to the Canada, Yulia Kovaliv.

Ukraine is currently conducting more than 28,000 investigations into possible war crimes committed by the Russian military, including the murder of 373 children, according to the country's ambassador to Canada.

According to Yulia Kovaliv, the investigations currently being carried out concern in particular the abduction of children and the murder of civilians trying to flee the war. Teams are trying to find evidence of these crimes and some Canadians are helping in the search.

We want to properly document every possible crime and we will bring Russia to justice,” Ms. Kovaliv said in an interview with The Canadian Press, during which she had to respond to a call from the attorney general of the United States. ;Ukraine about it.

Ms Kovaliv argued that Russia is not just trying to invade Ukraine, but to eliminate all of the country's cultural heritage .

She said Russian soldiers go so far as to burn books on Ukrainian history, bomb museums and churches, and force students in schools in the area. besieged territory to speak Russian in class.

Russia is now trying to eliminate Ukrainian culture from the territories it invaded and wants to give Russian passports to residents. The Ukrainians refuse to bend, even under threat.

Russia is also waging a war on energy, Ms. Kovaliv explained, as its forces have now bombed nearly 90% of Ukraine's wind farms and solar power generation facilities. Even so, Ukraine is trying to boost the supply of electricity that it exports to neighboring European countries.

The situation at a Russian-occupied nuclear power plant – the largest in Europe – is serious, however, according to the ambassador. Ukrainians try to prevent a disaster in the presence of armed Russian soldiers.

There is military equipment in the nuclear power plant, it is a huge risk, she warned.

On Wednesday, the ambassador will take advantage of Ukrainian Independence Day to organize the auction of a piece of Russian missile that crashed on a base where Canadian soldiers once carried out military training sessions for Ukrainian recruits. The proceeds from this sale will be used to help Ukraine in its fight against the Russian army.

Ms Kovaliv recovered the shrapnel fragment just before leaving for Canada to take up her new role as ambassador last April.

In fact, since arriving in Canada, Ms. Kovaliv has been moved by the generosity and support offered by Canadians throughout; other part of the country, in particular by noting the quantity of blue and yellow, the two colors of the Ukrainian flag, displayed almost everywhere.

She also takes photos with her cell phone and sends them to her Ukrainian friends who are at the front, to show that Canadians stand together.

It's important that people who are on the ground every day and who come under bombardment know that the whole world is behind them, said Ms. Kovaliv.

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